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To find out success rates at IVF clinics use either the CDC or the SART IVF success rate report

US Government's "Centers for Disease Control" (CDC) Report and the "Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology" (SART) Report

Page author Richard Sherbahn MD

  • The SART IVF success rate report for 2014 cycles was released in March 2016.
  • The preliminary CDC IVF success rate report for 2014 cycles was released in March 2016. The full report for 2014 is still not available.
  • Links to both of these reports are below.

IVF success rate statistics for all reputable clinics are available on the web from both the Centers for Disease Control and from SART.

  • The Centers for Disease Control is a US Government agency. It publishes IVF success rates annually for all reputable fertility clinics.
  • The CDC IVF report includes data on age, specific fertility causes, number of embryos transferred, single and multiple births, etc.
  • The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) also publishes annual reports for IVF and egg donation statistics
  • For any given year, SART releases its report 6-12 months before the CDC does

The best way to increase the success of IVF is by having procedures done at a high quality program.

  • Both the SART and CDC websites now show individual IVF clinic success rates for IVF and donor egg treatments
  • US clinics have IVF live birth rates ranging from 10% to over 60% - for women under age 35
  • Go to these sites and check success rates for any clinic that you are considering
  • Success rates vary significantly
  • Therefore, it is smart to research success rates before choosing a clinic for fertility treatment

Many fertility clinics have websites but don't post IVF live birth success rates on their sites.

Why not? Do they think patients don't want to know their success rates?

Below is a sample SART report for 2013 (our clinic's data)

  • Red arrow - IVF clinic name
  • Purple arrow - medical director of the IVF program
  • Dark green arrow - columns with outcome results for different female age groups
  • Dark blue arrow - Number of IVF "cycles" started (all women that started shots to do in vitro)
  • Pink arrow - percent of cycles started that led to a baby's birth (fresh eggs)
  • Orange arrow - percent of egg retrievals that led to a baby's birth (fresh eggs)
  • Light blue arrow - percent of frozen embryo transfers (own eggs) that led to a baby's birth
  • Light green arrow - percent of embryo transfers using fresh embryos and donor eggs that led to a baby's birth
  • Brown arrow - percent of embryo transfers using frozen embryos and donor eggs that led to a baby's birth
IVF success rates Chicago 2013

Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology released the 2014 IVF data in March 2016 To go to the SART site to check success rates:


To go to the CDC site to check success rates:

  • The CDC released its preliminary 2014 IVF report in 2016
  • Individual IVF center's results can be viewed online
  • The report is also available for download from the CDC as an Excel spreadsheet or a PDF report
  • Go to the CDC site to check any clinic's success rates for 2014 (or earlier)
  • On the CDC site, select a state, a clinic, and a year to see that clinic's in vitro success report

Below is the CDC's national summary table for 2012

Each fertility clinic has a similar page in this report with their IVF and donor egg success rates

  • Green shading shows heading for "fresh" IVF cycles (not frozen embryos) using nondonor eggs (using her own eggs)
  • Pink shading at the top shows the "age less than 35" column
  • Green arrow points to the % of embryos transferred that implanted and were later seen on pregnancy ultrasound
  • Red/brown arrow points to live birth rate "per cycle" (starting ovarian stimulating drugs for IVF is a "cycle")
  • Purple arrow points to the live birth rate "per transfer" procedure using fresh embryos
  • There are more cycles than transfers because some "cycles" are cancelled for poor response to drugs and others don't have a fresh transfer procedure for various reasons
  • Between the purple and orange lines are success rates using frozen embryos and a woman's own eggs (nondonor)
  • Yellow arrow points to the live birth rate per transfer using frozen-thawed embryos
  • Below the orange line are success rates using donor eggs
  • Orange arrow points to the live birth rate per transfer using fresh donor eggs (this, as well as the implantation rate using donor eggs are the most accurate and reliable measures of the quality of an IVF clinic)
  • Blue arrow points to the live birth rate per transfer using frozen embryos from donor eggs
2012 CDC national IVF report table

We are proud that our success rates have consistently been one of the highest in the Midwest.

  • But don't take our word for it. Use the reports to check and compare in vitro statistics.

We are not bragging if we back it up!

A comparison of clinic success rates may not be meaningful because patient medical characteristics, treatment approaches and entrance criteria for ART may vary from clinic to clinic